Child Support Lawyer in Florida

child support in Florida

Financial child support is the responsibility of every parent, regardless of whether the two parents are married, divorced, or never married. In divorce cases, a child support payment plan must be approved by a Florida family law court before a final divorce decree is entered. While both parents will be required to support the children, the parent without primary custody will be expected to make their payments directly to the parent with primary custody. The amount and duration of the payments will be based on Florida’s child support laws. For more information about child support law, or for help collecting the child support you are owed, contact a Florida child support lawyer at Florida Law Advisers, P.A.

The amount of the payments must be in accordance with Florida child support law and the Florida Child Support Guidelines. The main factors determining the amount of support to be paid are the combined monthly net incomes of both parents and the number of children they have together. The amount of time each parent spends with the child may also have an impact on the amount of child support required to be paid. Additional factors such as the medical, dental, psychological, and educational needs of the child will also be considered.

When a couple decides to divorce, a judge will require a child support payment plan that is in the best interests of the child. Child support payments cannot be waived by the two parents; every child is entitled to the support. These payments are designed to assist with expenses such as clothing, food, healthcare, education, and other needs of a child.

If the required child support is not paid it can create an undue hardship for the child and other parent. If the child support payments you are entitled to receive are late or are not paid by the other parent, call us right away to speak with a child support attorney at our firm. Our team of child support lawyers can take immediate action to help you receive the child support you are owed. To begin, we can petition a court to establish a garnishment of the noncomplying parent’s paycheck or bank account. This garnishment will automatically deduct the funds you are entitled to receive from the other parent’s paycheck or bank account and deposit the funds directly into your account.

Speak To a Child Support Attorney in Florida

The family lawyers at Florida Law Advisers, P.A., have years of experience in all child custody matters. We have a thorough understanding of the law and are skilled advocates in the courtroom. Regardless of whether you are in the middle of a divorce or trying to collect child support payments, we can help. Contact us today by phone, email, or live web chat to speak with a child custody attorney at our law firm.

Frequently Asked Questions

Under Florida law, a parent cannot waive child support. Technically, child support is owed to the child and the parent does not have the ability to waive it. Further, judges may not complete a custody or divorce case unless child support is addressed.

If a parent is hiding income, the court can impute a salary on that parent. The court can also impute income if a parent is unemployed or underemployed. If proven, the parent will be obligated to pay support based on the imputed salary.

The court can impute income if a parent is unemployed or underemployed. If proven, the parent will be obligated to pay support based on the imputed salary. In imputation cases, the court will consider the parent’s work history, qualifications, and prevailing income level in the community.

Yes, Florida law allows a parent to seek retroactive child support for up to 24 months. Prior to the enactment of the retroactive child support law, back child support for paternity cases was not limited to 24 months and could go as far back as to the birth of the child.

If the other parent has stopped paying support without court approval you may have grounds to file a motion for contempt. If the motion is granted, the court will require the support to be paid. Additionally, they can impose penalties against the party who failed to pay.

Normally, child support ends when the child turns 18. However, the support can be extended until the child turns 19, if the child is still in high school. Additionally, if there are special needs for the child, support may be extended past 19 years of age.

A petition to establish child support can be filed in court to establish child support. The amount of support will be based on Florida’s Child Support Guidelines. You are not required to hire an attorney, but it is recommended to obtain an attorney.

Paying child support does not necessarily also include child custody rights. If the other parent is withholding custody, you may need to file a petition to establish parenting plan. When deciding custody, the judge will review all the details of the case and award custody based on what is in the child’s best interest.